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Peperoncini (or pepperoncini), common names Tuscan peppers, sweet Italian peppers, golden Greek peppers, and Kyle peppers, are a variety of the species Capsicum annuum. While called peperoncini in American English, these particular kind of peppers, in Italy, are called friggitello (plural friggitelli) or more generally peperone (plural peperoni) like other sweet varieties of peppers, while the term peperoncini (singular peperoncino) is used for hotter varieties of chili peppers.[1] The Greek varieties are sweeter and less bitter than the Italian varieties grown in Tuscany. Peperoncini are mild with a slight heat and a hint of bitterness, and are commonly pickled and sold packaged in jars.

Cultivation

Peperoncini grow on a bushy plant that reaches 30 inches (77 cm) in height and produces sweet green peppers that turn red when mature. Usually picked at 2 to 3 inches (5 to 8 cm) long, these bright green, wrinkled peppers taper to a blunt, lobed end.

 

 

Uses

Peperoncini are typically used in sandwiches, salads (particularly Greek salad, tossed salads served in pizzerias and antipasto platters) and as a garnish to lend dishes a crunchy texture and a salty taste.

Peperoncini are sometimes briefly rinsed in cold water before serving to reduce the effects of the pickling brine on the taste. Pickled peperoncini can vary in colour from bright yellow to bright yellow-green.

Written on February 29th, 2012 , Botany, Vegetables Tags:

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