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Psidium cattleianum,[1][2] named in honour of notable English horticulturist Sir William Cattley, commonly known as Cattley guava or Peruvian guava, is a small tree (2–6 m tall), bearing small red or yellow fruit, which are somewhat sour but sometimes eaten or made into jam. The red-fruited variety is known as strawberry guava; the yellow-fruited variety is known as lemon guava, and in Hawaii as waiawī. Native to Brazil and adjacent tropical South America, it is closely related to common guava (P. guajava), and like that species is a widespread, highly invasive species in tropical areas, especially Hawaiʻi. It tends to form dense, monotypic stands which prevent regrowth of native species, and is very difficult to eradicate. As an invasive species, it is sometimes erroneously called Chinese guava.

The fruit can be eaten by cutting them in half and scooping out the pulp and seeds or by biting off a piece of the rind and sucking out the insides. Strawberry guavas taste like a passionfruit mixed with strawberry; lemon guavas have a more acidic and spicier flavour.[1][citation needed] The seeds are small and white in colour and can be roasted as a substitute for coffee. Its leaves may be brewed for tea. The skin is also edible and tastes a bit like rose petals but is best removed for a sweeter flavour.

Written on June 20th, 2012 , Fruits Tags:

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